Monthly Archives: January 2014

Thoughts on dark software

I wrote a two-page white paper for a DOE workshop on software productivity for extreme-scale science. In this paper, I coin a new term (at least I think it is new!): dark software. I explain this concept below:

Scientific discovery is the result not of individual simulations but of complex end-to-end research processes. These processes frequently involve, for example, the ingest and analysis of simulation, experimental, and observational data; the invocation of simulations within larger design optimization and uncertainty quantification activities; validation through comparison of experimental and simulation data;

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Micrometrics as a solution to software invisibility

Software is central to modern science. But software is also largely invisible, and in consequence, is undervalued, poorly understood, and subject to what appear to be underinvestment and policy decisions that are not driven by data. We must do better if we want science to address the challenges faced by humankind in a time of massive scientific opportunity but limited resources. I argue here that micrometrics can help us do better.

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The History of the Grid: Comments invited

GUSTOTwo years ago, Carl Kesselman and I published a rather lengthy paper that purports to recount the “history of the grid.” (I. Foster, C. Kesselman, The History of the Grid (PDF), in Cloud Computing and Big DataIOS PressAmsterdam , 2013; 37 pages, 176 references).

We believe that this paper includes useful material. We also know that it can be much improved, and to that end we plan a second edition.

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